#1: a class Trip to the Library (b) #2: Parents Take Their Children to the Library (b)



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ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Curriculum

Supporting Children’s Learning:

Unit 4 Using the Library

Activities:

#1: A Class Trip to the Library (b)

#2: Parents Take Their Children to the Library (b)

#3: How to Find Books You Want (b)

Developed by Susan Klaw

© English for New Bostonians 2014

About English for New Bostonians

English for New Bostonians (ENB) is a public-private-community partnership whose mission is to increase access to high-quality English learning opportunities for adult immigrants in Boston. Through grant making, capacity-building, and public outreach and education, ENB expands the number of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) seats available, improves program quality in agencies across the City, and leverages private and public resources. Founded in 2001 by the Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians (MONB), ENB now involves several city departments, approximately 20 public and private funders, and numerous community organizations.


About the ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Initiative

The ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Initiative aims to increase immigrant parents’ English communication skills and ability to support their children’s educational success. It is a partnership among ENB, the Boston Public Schools Department of Adult Education and Community Services, and MONB, and includes program support, curriculum development, and coordination among community and public school partners.


About Susan Klaw and Curriculum Design Team

Susan Klaw has directed, taught in, and developed original curriculum materials for Boston-based parent ESOL programs since 1991. She has delivered extensive training locally and nationally on various aspects of Family Literacy and been named a “Literacy Champion” by the Massachusetts Literacy Foundation, Parent Educator of the Year by the Children’s Trust Fund, and Adult Educator of the Year by the Massachusetts Coalition for Adult Education. Special thanks to the Curriculum Design Team of over 20 teachers and stakeholders from community-based organizations, Boston Public Schools, and other agencies for their input and careful piloting at all stages of the process.


About the ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Curriculum

The Curriculum gives ESOL teachers background materials, lessons and activities designed to help immigrant parents learn English and become more effectively involved in their children’s education. With this curriculum, ESOL teachers can orient immigrant parents to the US school system and Boston Public Schools, provide them with practical skills such as interpreting report cards and participating in teacher conferences, and help them support children’s learning at home. While some of the information is Boston-specific, much can be used in any locale.


Using the ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Curriculum

All materials are intended to be downloaded and widely used. Please cite English for New Bostonians and credit English for New Bostonians on all reproductions. We welcome feedback and stories on how you and your students are using the ESOL for Parents and Caregivers Curriculum!


Thanks to the many public and private funders that have supported this project, especially the Barr Foundation, Harold Whitworth Pierce Charitable Trust, Highland Street Foundation, Mabel Louise Riley Foundation, Liberty Mutual Foundation and the Mayor’s Office for New Bostonians We Are Boston Gala.

Contact us at info@englishfornewbostonians.org

or visit us online at www.englishfornewbostonians.org
ACTIVITY #1: A CLASS TRIP TO THE LIBRARY

(Can be used/adapted for use with beginning level students)
Rationale:

Many immigrant students are unfamiliar with public libraries and have never gone to their branch library. They don’t know they are free. They don’t know they can use the library regardless of their document status. They don’t know that libraries often have books in multiple languages and have computers with Internet access they can use. Overall they don’t realize what a wonderful resource libraries can be for themselves and their children. Rather than telling students about the library system and encouraging them to go frequently to the branch closest to them, a class trip to the library is a more effective way to introduce students to this most important community resource.


An anecdote from Susan Klaw, ESOL for Parents Curriculum Developer:

I took an ESOL class of parents to the local East Boston library last year. After our trip, one of the parents said to me (translated from the Spanish she used), “Thank you so much Susan. I walk by the library every day with my son to go home from school. He always wants to go to the library because his teacher talked about it. But I didn’t know. I was afraid to go in. So we never went. I was worried no one would speak Spanish and that maybe without, you know, papers, I shouldn’t go in. Now I can take him a lot.”


Student Objectives:

  • Students will become familiar with the library system by visiting a local branch library.

  • Students will learn basic library related vocabulary.

  • Students will get and use a library card.

  • Students will know where the branch library closest to their house is located.


Materials:

  • Handout: “Tips for Parents: Resources at Your Library,” Colorín Colorado, www.colorincolorado.org/article/37044/

  • Handout: Library Related Vocabulary

  • Handout: Using the Library


Activity Outline:


  1. Explain objectives.




  1. Before the trip: Introduce the concept of libraries and go over library vocabulary in a class before the trip itself.




    1. Opening discussion: How many of you have gone to the library here in Boston? Ask for a show of hands and for students to elaborate on their experiences. How many of you went to libraries in your home countries? Ask for a show of hands and have students elaborate.




    1. Share your own personal experience with libraries, especially how you used them with your own children or when you were a child.




    1. Explain how public libraries work, using “Tips for Parents: Resources at Your Library” from Colorín Colorado ( www.colorincolorado.org/article/37044/). It is an excellent, simply written overview of how libraries work and what students can find there, with a lot of wonderful literacy related vocabulary. It is also available in Spanish and might be given out to Spanish speaking students to take home. When summarizing the material, make sure to emphasize that 1) libraries are free and 2) students do not need to be documented to use the library.




    1. Distribute Handout: Library Related Vocabulary and go over the words. Tell students they will probably hear these words during their trip to the library. Alternately, this can be done during the library trip itself as a mini lesson once the library tour is completed.




    1. Explain that a major goal of the trip is for all students to get and use their library cards. To get or replace a lost library card, students will need to bring a picture ID of any sort, plus something with their name and current address on it (a bill is fine). Those students who already have library cards should bring them. Explain that they will be able to borrow books immediately and that will be part of the plan for the class trip.




  1. The trip itself:




    1. Go to a branch library that is most convenient for you and your class.




    1. Tour the library when you arrive so students will get an overview of what the library offers and where the different parts of the library are. This should be arranged ahead of time with, ideally, the children’s librarian.




    1. Have students get their library cards.




    1. Distribute the handout: Using the Library. Ask students to work on it individually and show it to you when they are finished. Remind them that they can always ask the librarian for help.




    1. If there is time, use the Tip Sheet for a kind of scavenger hunt. The second page is entitled “What can I find at the Library?” and lists different kinds of books and audiovisual resources. Each student can be assigned one of the items on these lists to go and find and bring back to the group.



  1. After the trip:




    1. Opening discussion: What did you like about the library? Write responses on the board. Would your children like going to the library? Why? Write responses on the board.




    1. Go on-line to look at a listing of the Boston Public Library 25 branch libraries. (www.bpl.org) Have students identify and write down the address and hours of the branch library closest to them.




    1. In case students didn’t learn this on their library tour, or to remind them, explain how libraries have passes to most Boston museums which students can borrow. These make going to the museums much more affordable. They usually have to reserve the passes quite far in advance.




    1. Encourage students to make going to the library a regular part of their routine.


Follow-Up:


  • Show students how they can get a weekly calendar of events at their closest branch library sent to them via email. Go to www.bpl.org/branches Choose the local branch the student is interested in. Go to “Current programs and activities” on the left. Open that up and a monthly calendar of events appears. At the top of that calendar, the student can choose “subscribe.” Several options pop up. Most students will want to choose the Receive Weekly Email option.




  • For intermediate students, Future, English for Results 3 (textbook series, Pearson Longman) has reading/exercise section on a children’s library which reviews useful library vocabulary, pp. 52-54.




  • With more advanced students, devise an assignment which takes them to the library to complete.




  • Take a class trip to visit the main library in Copley Square.

Handout: Library Related Vocabulary
Directions: As we discuss these words, write down the definitions in your own words.
borrow

branch library

library card

due date

renew

check out



pre-school story time

fiction


non-fiction

biography



Handout: Using the Library
You have now toured the library and gotten a library card. Now you will begin to use the library. Follow the directions below.
1. Choose one book or magazine to borrow today for yourself.

Write the name of book or magazine you chose: _____________________________


2. Choose a book to borrow today for your child.
Write the name of the book you chose:____________________________________
Choose a DVD to borrow today for your family to watch together.
Write the name of the DVD you chose: __________________________________
3. Write the date your books are due back to the library:____________________
4. Write the date your DVD is due back to the library: ______________________
5. Find out what hours the library is open. Right these down below.
Mondays____ Tuesdays_____ Wednesdays _____ Thursdays____

Fridays_____ Saturdays_____ Sundays_______

5. Find out when the library has Pre-School Story Time.
Write down the day and time of Pre-School Story time: _______________________
6. What other programs does the library offer? When?
______________________________________
______________________________________
6. Collect one flyer about a library or community event.
What event does the flyer advertise?____________________________

ACTIVITY #2: PARENTS TAKE THEIR CHILDREN TO THE LIBRARY

(Can be used/adapted for use with beginning level students)
Rationale:

We want our students and their children to become life long library users and library lovers as a way to promote success in school and the utilization of community resources for family enrichment.


Student Objectives:

  • Students will take their children to the library.

  • Students will help their children get their own library cards

  • Students will help their children borrow materials from the library.


Materials:

  • Children’s book: Lola at the Library, by Anna Mcquinn and Rosalind Beardshaw, single or multiple copies. This is an easy to read story about Lola, a young black girl, and how her weekly trip to the library with her mother is her favorite activity.

  • Handout: Family Assignment Grades K-3: A Trip to the Library

  • Handout: Family Assignment Grades 4-5: A Trip to the Library


Activity Outline:


  1. Explain objectives.




  1. Opening discussion: How do you feel about having a library card? How do you think your children would feel about having their own library cards? About going to the library?




  1. Read Lola at the Library aloud to the class. It is easy enough for all levels of students to understand even if they do not have their own copies to follow. If you do have multiple copies, have students take turns reading.




  1. Explain this independent assignment: students will take their children to a branch library close to their house, sometime in the coming week. The goal is for their children to get their own library cards and to borrow books and DVD’s. They will have a family assignment to do with their children at the library. Remind students that they previously wrote down the name, address and hours of the branch library closest to them.




  1. Go over the family assignment(s). Remind parents that they can always ask the children’s librarian for help in finding books. Remind them they will have to bring some form of identification with the child’s name and address on it in order to get their child a library cards.




  1. Once the independent trips to the library have been completed, use class time for students to report back on their experiences with their children.


Follow-Up:
If you have purchased or made multiple copies of Lola at the Library, have students borrow it to take home and read with their younger children. Have them report back how their children liked the book. Encourage students to look for other Lola books at the library. It is a series.


Handout: Family Assignment Grades K-3: A Trip to the Library
Child Name:___________________ Parent Name:______________________


  1. Help your child pick a short picture book in English or your home language that s/he is interested in. Read that book together in the library.




  • Write the title and author of the book here:

Title: ____________________________________________


Author: ___________________________________________


  1. Sign your child up for his or her own library card. You will need to have some form of identification for your child, such as a Mass Health card.



  1. Look for flyers about upcoming events at the library or in the community. Choose one and discuss it with your child. See if your child would like to go to the event.




  • What was the event you discussed? __________________________________



  1. Find at least one book (any language is fine) and one DVD your child would like to borrow from the library. Check them out.




  • My books are due back to the library on: _____________________




  • My DVD’s are due back to the library on: _______________________



Extra credit: Reserve a pass to one of the museums. Choose a time in the future you would like to go and ask whether you could reserve a pass that day.


  • I reserved a museum pass for ________________________ on __________.


Handout: Family Assignment Grades 4-5

A Trip to the Library

Child Name:___________________ Parent Name:______________________




  1. Imagine your child has a research paper to write on whales. Look for information about whales in the library. How would you find a book on whales? Can you find information on the Internet? Remember, you can ask the librarian for help.




    • List two sources of information on whales that you found:

____________________________


____________________________



  1. Look for flyers about upcoming events at the library or in the community. Choose one and discuss it with your child. See if your child would like to go to the event.




  • What was the event you discussed? _______________________________




  1. Sign your child up for his own library card if he/she doesn’t have one. You will need to have some form of identification for your child, such as a Mass Health card.




  1. Help your child find at least two chapter books s/he would like to read. Suggest your child looks for an author or series they know they like. Help your child find one DVD the family might watch together. Check out these items.




  • My books are due back to the library on: ________________________

  • My DVD’s are due back to the library on: ________________________


Extra credit: Reserve a pass to one of the museums. Choose a time in the future you would like to go and ask whether you could reserve a pass that day
I reserved a museum pass for ___________________________ on __________.


ACTIVITY #3: How to Find Books You Want

(Can be used/adapted for use with beginning level students)
Rationale:

It is important that parents be able to choose and help find specific library books for their children to borrow. Immigrant parents, however, usually have no knowledge of American children’s books nor know how to find specific books, say from a summer reading list their children bring home, or books on a topic that their child is interested in.


Student Objectives:

  • Students will learn several ways to choose books from the library for their children.

  • Students will be able to ask the librarian for help when looking for specific books at the library.


Materials:

  • Handout: Asking Questions at the Library

  • Handout: Library dialogues

  • Handout: Libros Para Compartir Con Su Familia, for Spanish speaking parents

  • Handout: Bibliography of good children’s books for Arabic speaking parents

  • Handout: Good Books to Share with Your Children


Activity Outline:


  1. Explain objectives.




  1. Opening discussion: Explain that it is good to let children choose a few books on their own to borrow, but that parents should also choose books that they think their children will like and/or will be good for generating discussion. Remind them that it is important for children to read a variety of different kinds of books—fiction, non-fiction, poetry, etc. Brainstorm with parents how to choose books, listing answers on the board. Add to the list so it includes:

  • Other books by authors children have liked

  • Other books in a series children have liked

  • Books on topics children are interested in

  • Books on topics you want your children to know more about


Note: this is a good way to review basic book vocabulary from Activity #5 in the Reading With Children Unit which precedes this unit on Uslng the Library.


  1. Ask: When you go to the library, how do you find these books you want to borrow? Emphasize that the best way to find specific books is to ask the children’s librarian for assistance. Typically, they are very happy to help.




  1. Distribute Handout: Asking Questions at the Library. Go over the basic information at the top of the handout on how books are organized in a library. Then have students practice the questions aloud. Reinforce the questions by using some of them as a dictation exercise.




  1. Distribute Handout: Library Dialogues. Read them over as a group, and then have students practice the dialogues in pairs, switching roles several times. As an extension with intermediate students, do parent/librarian role plays in which the parent is trying to find a specific book.




  1. If there are Spanish and Arabic speakers in the class, distribute to them the two targeted bibliographies. For speakers of other languages, distribute the English children’s book list. These bibliographies were drawn up by Alice Levine, Family Education Curriculum Specialist, Department of Family and Student Engagement, BPS. Explain to students that the Boston Public library has all these books. If a given book is not at a specific branch library, the librarians will order it and call when it arrives. Give them ample time to look over the book lists. Explain the task which is to circle three books that would be appropriate for their children and that they would like to borrow from the library. Have students write their names on these bibliographies and, if you are going to go to the library as a class, collect them.




  1. Ideally, you will take a second class trip to the library. Once there, take a few minutes to practice again the questions students can use in speaking with the librarian. Then give back the bibliographies students used previously. Tell them their assignment is to find and/or request the three books they circled by asking the librarian for assistance. Explain to the librarian what the purpose of the class visit is, and if relevant, ask her to only speak in English with the students. If it isn’t possible to take a class trip, then the same task can be assigned as homework.

Handout: Asking Questions at the Library

If you want to find specific books at the library, first you should know a little about how books are organized. Second, you should know how to ask the librarian to help you.


How are books organized at the library?


  • Fiction books are organized alphabetically by the last name of the authors. Thus if you were looking for Dr. Seuss books (like The Cat in the Hat), you would look under S. Ask the librarian where the fiction books are.




  • Non-fiction books are organized by subject. You can ask the librarian to help you find books about a particular subject. Each subject has a number which is on the spine of the book.


What do you ask the librarian?

››When you want to find a specific title:



  • Could you help me find this book? (Show librarian the title)

  • Do you have this book? (Show librarian the title)

››To find more books by an author you or your child likes:




  • Where can I find books by ______________________?

            • Name of author

  • Can you help me find books by ____________________?

Name of author
›› When you want to find books about a topic:


  • Where do you have books about animals (science, weather, etc)?

›› When you want to find books in Spanish or in Arabic:




  • Are the Spanish (Arabic, Chinese, etc.) books in a special section? Can you show me where they are?



Handout: Library Dialogues
Dialogue #1:
Parent: Do you have the book Wilma Unlimited, by Kathleen Krull?

Librarian: I’ll look it up for you.

Parent: Thank you.

Librarian: No, we don’t have it here, but I can order it for you.

Parent: That would be great. How long will it take?

Librarian: The book will probably be here in a few days. I can call you when it comes in.

Parent: Thank you very much.
Dialogue #2:
Parent: My son is very interested in dinosaurs. Where can I find books about dinosaurs?

Librarian: That would be over in the corner. Let me show you.

Parent: Okay, thanks very much.

Librarian: Here they are. On this shelf you should find lots of books about dinosaurs.
Dialogue #3:
Parent: My son likes the Curious George books. I know there are lots in the series. Where can I find them?

Librarian: The author is H.A. Rey. So you would look in the fiction section under R.

Parent: Where is the fiction section?

Librarian: Fiction starts here. On the other side you will find the authors starting with R, S and T.

Handout: Libros Para Compartir Con Su Familia1
Parte 1: Libros que pueden obtener en solo un idioma (español o inglés)
Libros Populares Para Niños Pequeños


  • Jorge el Curioso o Curious George (muchos libros en el serie) por H.A. Rey

  • Buenas Noches, Luna o Good Night, Moon por Margaret Wise Brown

  • Libros de Maisy por Lucy Cousins

  • Madeline por Ludwig Bemelmans

  • Libros de Clifford por Norman Bridwell

  • La Oruga Muy Hambrienta o The Very Hungry Caterpillar por Eric Carle

  • Libros de Arturo por Marc Brown

  • El Hallazgo de Jamaica o Jamaica’s Find por Juanita Havill

  • Un Bolsillo Para Corduroy o A Pocket for Corduroy (y otros libros en el serie) por Don Freeman

  • Abuela por Arthur Dorros (El mismo título en los dos idiomas)


Otros libros para compartir con sus niños:


  • Está Bien Ser Diferente o It’s OK to be Different por Todd Parr [pre-escolar]

  • Laborioso deditos de las manos o Busy Fingers por C.W. Bowie [pre-escolar]

  • Lola le Lee al Pequeño Leo o Lola Reads to Leo por Anna McQuinn [pre-escolar]

  • ¿Hay Alguien en Casa? o Is Anyone Home? por David Le Jars [pre-escolar]

  • La Muñeca de Elizabeti o Elizabeti’s Doll por Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen

  • Abran Paso a Los Patitos o Make Way for Ducklings por Robert McCloskey [¡pueden ir al jardín público de Boston para ver los barcos de cisne y los patitos con sus niños!]

  • Los Dibujos de David o David’s Drawings por Cathryn Falwell

  • Las Abuelas de Liliana o Liliana’s Grandmothers (sobre una abuela en EEUU y la otra en Colombia) por Leyla Torres

  • Lola en la Biblioteca o Lola at the Library por Anna McQuinn y Rosalind Beardshaw

  • Los Discos de Mi Abuela o Grandma’s Records por Eric Velasquez

  • El Jardín de Flores o Flower Garden por Eve Bunting

  • El Tapiz de Abuela o Abuela’s Weave por Omar S. Castaneda

  • Momentos Tiernos en el Reino Animal o Tender Moments in the Wild (un buen libro para leer antes o después de un paseo al zoo) por Stephanie Maze

  • Quienquiera que Seas o Whoever You Are por Mem Fox

  • Los Dibujos de David o David’s Drawings por Cathryn Falwell

  • Llaman a la Puerta o The Doorbell Rang por Pat Hutchins

  • Se Necesita Todo un Pueblo o It Takes a Village por Jane Cowen-Fletcher

  • Las Aventuras de Max, el Perro Taxista o The Adventures of Taxi Dog por Debra y Sal Barracca

  • Un Mundo Nuevo o When This World Was New (¡sobre un inmigrante de una isla trópica que ahora vive en Nueva York—en la nieve!) por D. H. Figueredo

  • Bajo La Luna de Limón o Under the Lemon Moon por Edith Hope Fine

  • Un Regalo de Gracias o Gift of Gracias por Julia Alvarez


Libros para familias con niños más grandes o toda la familia:


  • Wilma sin límites o Wilma Unlimited por Kathleen Krull

  • Gracias, Señor Falker o Thank You, Mr. Falker por Patricia Polacco

  • ¿Adónde van las personas cuando mueren? o Where do People Go When They Die? por Mindy Avra Portnoy

  • Ser Vecinos o Be My Neighbor por Maya Ajmera and John D. Ivanko [con fotos de todos partes del mundo]

  • La Calle es Libre o The Street is Free

  • El beisbol nos salvó o Baseball Saved Us por Ken Mochizuki

  • Baseball en los Barrios o Baseball in the Barrios por Henry Horenstein

  • La llaman América o America is her Name (acerca de una persona indígena de México que vive ahora en Chicago) por Luis Rodriguez

  • Cosechando esperanza: la historia de César Chávez o Harvesting Hope (una historia verdadera acerca de trabajadores migrantes) por Kathleen Krull

  • Tomás y la señora de la biblioteca o Tomás and the Library Lady por Pat Mora (sobre una familia quien son trabajadores migrantes)

  • El camino de Amelia o Amelia’s Road (otro libro acerca de los trabajadores migrantes) por Linda Jacobs Altman

  • La Escuela de Lona Azul o The Blue Tarp School por Edith Hope Fine (sobre una escuela cerca de un basurero en México)


Parte 2: Libros Bilingües
Para niños más jóvenes:


  • My Grandma/Mi Abuelita por Ginger Foglesong Guy [pre-escolar]

  • Mis Abuelos y Yo/My Grandparents and I por Samuel Caraballo

  • Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match/Marisol McDonald No Combina por Monica Brown

  • Clara and the Curandera/Clara y la curandera por Monica Brown

  • Rene Has Two Last Names/Rene Tiene Dos Apellidos por Rene Colato Lainez

  • Grandma’s Chocolate/El chocolate de Abuelita por Mara Price

  • My Day/Mi Día (muchas imágenes comunes con sus nombres en inglés y español) por Rebecca Emberley

  • Everybody Has Feelings/Todos Tenemos Sentimientos por Charles E. Avery

  • ¡Fiesta! por Ginger Foglesong Guy

  • We are Cousins/Somos Primos por Diane Gonzales Bertrand

  • My Friends/Mis Amigos por Taro Gomi

  • Estrellita se despide de su isla/Estrellita Says Good-Bye to Her Iland (acerca de Puerto Rico) por Samuel Caraballo

  • My Pal, Victor/Mi amigo, Victor (acerca de dos amigos, uno con una disabilidad) por Diane Gonzales Bertrand

  • Lupita’s Papalote/El papalote de Lupita por Lupe Ruiz-Flores

  • Icy Watermelon/Sandia fría por Mary Sue Galindo

  • Sopa de frijoles/Bean Soup (¡un poema para cocinar!) por Jorge Argueta

  • Un día con mis tías/A Day with My Aunts por Anilú Bernardo

  • Just Like Home/Como en Mi Tierra por Elizabeth I. Miller

  • Family/Familia (mexicano-americanos) por Diane Gonzales Bertrand

  • Gracias/Thanks por Pat Mora

  • Playing Lotería/El juego de la lotería (acerca de un niño que está visitando a su abuela en México) por René Colato Laínez


Para niños más grandes o toda la familia:


  • Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows in the Bronx/Sonia Sotomayor: La Juez Que Creció en el Bronx por Jonah Winter

  • My Diary From Here to There/Mi Diario de Aquí Hasta Allá por Amada Irma Pérez

  • Antonio’s Card/La Tarjeta de Antonio por Rigoberto Gonzalez

  • Remembering Grandma/Recordando a Abuela (acerca de la muerte) por Teresa Armas

  • ¡Sí, Se Puede! Yes We Can! (acerca de una huelga de trabajadores de limpieza en Los Angeles) por Diana Cohn

  • Pie-Biter/Comepasteles (en inglés, español, y chino—una leyenda de trabajadores del ferrocarril de China) por Ruthanne Lum McCunn

  • It Doesn’t Have To be This Way: A Barrio Story/ No Tiene Que Ser Así: Una Historia del Barrio (acerca de pandillas/bandas) por Luis J. Rodriguez

  • Xochitl and the Flowers/Xochitl, la Niña de las Flores (acerca de Salvadoreños en los Estados Unidos) por Jorge Argueta

  • Waiting for Papa/Esperando a Papa (acerca de una familia de El Salvador en los EEUU) por René Colato Laínez

  • The Storyteller’s Candle/La velita de los cuentos (acerca de la primera bibliotecaria puertorriqueña en Nueva York) por Lucia González

  • Braids/Trencitas por Kathleen Contreras

  • From North to South/Del Norte al Sur (acerca de una familia mexicana sin documentos) 0por René Colato Laínez


Parte 3: Libros que solo están disponibles en las bibliotecas de Boston en un idioma
Solo en español:

  • La Calle es Libre (La versión en inglés, The Streets are Free está disponible en Amazon.com) por Kurusa

  • Nuestros Derechos por Maria Joao Carvalho (sobre los derechos de los niños del mundo)

  • El Sancocho del Sábado por Leyla Torres (con una receta por sancocho al fin del libro)


Solo en inglés:

  • Celia Cruz, Queen of Salsa por Veronica Chambers

  • My Two Worlds por Ginger Gordon (sobre una chica en Nueva York y en la República Dominicana!)

  • Yes We Can! A Salute to Children from President Obama’s Victory Speech


Handout:Some Selected Books in the Boston Public Library for Arabic-speaking Families2
Bilingual:

Spot Goes to School by Eric Hill (for young children)

Samira’s Eid by Nasreen Aktar

Mei Ling’s Hiccups by David Mills (translated by Azza Habashi)

Mirror by Jeannie Baker (Pictures of two families going shopping—one in Morocco and the other in Australia.)

Lebanon 1-2-3 A Counting book in three Languages (English, French and Arabic) by Marijean Moran Boueri

Handa’s Surprise by Eileen Browne

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

Who Lives Here? By Kathleen Rizzi (Board book)

Walking Through the Jungle by Barefoot Books; Illustrated by Debbie Harter



In Arabic only:

by Mutlaq Rafiq Book about animal Camouflage al-Tamwīyah wa-sīlat difā tabīiyah

Books by Charlotte Guillain:
Planets الكواكب

The Moon Al-Qamar

The Sun Al-Shams

The Earth Al-Ard

Books (about different feelings) by Sarah Medina:

Sad Al-Huzn

Angry Al-Ghadab

Proud Al-Fakhr

Jealous Al-Ghayrah Happy Al-Sa’adah

Books in English about North Africa, the Middle East, or Muslim Families
Going to Mecca by Na’ima B. Robert

My Father’s Shop by Satomi Ichikawa (Morocco)

The Butter Man by Elizabeth Alalou and Ali Alalou (Morocco)

The Day of Ahmed’s Secret by Florence Parry Heide and Judie Heide Gilliland (Egypt)

Islamic Stories by Anita Ganeri

Ramadan: Count and Celebrate by Fredrick L McKissack, Jr. and Lisa Beringer McKissack

The Children of Morocco by Jules Hermes

Ramadan by Molly Aloian



Examples of other kinds of books you might want to share with your children:

Books and CD packages:

Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina



Wordless books or books with very few words:

Ah Ha! By Jeff Mack

One Boy by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Pop-up Books:

Animal Opposites by Petr Horacek

The Amazing Pop-Up Geography Book by Kate Petty and Jennie Maizels

To Do Books:

Making Puppets by Sally Henry and Trevor Cook



Books about Famous Americans:

A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman by David A. Adler

Martin Luther King by Rosemary L. Bray

Becoming Babe Ruth by Matt Tavares



Handout: Books to Share With Your Family3
Popular Books for Small Children
Curious George (many books in this series ) by H.A. Rey

Good Night, Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Maisy (many books in this series) by Lucy Cousins

Madeline (many books in this series) by Ludwig Bemelmans

Clifford (many books in this series) by Norman Bridwell

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Arthur (many books in this series) by Marc Brown

Jamaica’s Find by Juanita Havill

A Pocket for Corduroy (and other books in this series) by Don Freeman

Abuela by Arthur Dorros
Other books to share with your children:
It’s OK to be Different by Todd Parr [pre-school]

Busy Fingers by C.W. Bowie [pre-school]

Lola Reads to Leo by Anna McQuinn [pre-school]

Is Anyone Home? by David Le Jars [pre-school]

Elizabeti’s Doll by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey (you can go to the Public Gardens in Boston to see the swan boats and the ducklings with your children)

David’s Drawings by Cathryn Falwell

Liliana’s Grandmothers by Leyla Torres

Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn y Rosalind Beardshaw

Grandma’s Records by Eric Velasquez

Flower Garden by Eve Bunting

Abuela’s Weave by Omar S. Castaneda

Tender Moments in the Wild (a good book to read before or after a trip to the zoo) by Stephanie Maze

Whoever You Are by Mem Fox

David’s Drawings by Cathryn Falwell

The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

It Takes a Village by Jane Cowen-Fletcher

The Adventures of Taxi Dog by Debra and Sal Barracca

When This World Was New (about an immigrant from a tropical island who now lives in New York, in the snow) by D. H. Figueredo

Under the Lemon Moon by Edith Hope Fine

Gift of Gracias by Julia Alvarez
Books for families with older children

or for the whole family
Wilma Unlimited by Kathleen Krull

Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco

Where do People Go When They Die? By Mindy Avra Portnoy

Be My Neighbor by Maya Ajmera and John D. Ivanko

Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki

Baseball in the Barrios byHenry Horenstein

America is her Name by Luis Rodriguez

Harvesting Hope (a true story about migrant workers) by Kathleen Krull

Tomás and the Library Lady by Pat Mora

Amelia’s Road by Linda Jacobs Altman

1 Alice Levine, Family Education Curriculum Specialist, Department of Family and Student Engagement, Boston Public Schools.

2 Alice Levine, Family Education Curriculum Specialist, Department of Family and Student Engagement, Boston Public Schools.

3 Alice Levine, Family Education Curriculum Specialist, Department of Family and Student Engagement, Boston Public Schools.

Using the library: Topic 3 Unit 4 Page ©English for New Bostonians 2014


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