Project glad la granja/the farm (kinder) Albuquerque Public Schools Adapted from Willamette Educational Service District Shealon Cooper, North Santiam S. D. Amy Erwin, North Santiam S. D. By Rhonda Lopez, Kavita Krishna, Annette Maestas



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Project GLAD

LA GRANJA/THE FARM (KINDER)

Albuquerque Public Schools

Adapted from Willamette Educational Service District

Shealon Cooper, North Santiam S.D.

Amy Erwin, North Santiam S. D.

By Rhonda Lopez, Kavita Krishna, Annette Maestas, & Denise V. Balderas

Farmer to Consumer Grade 1

IDEA PAGES

I. UNIT THEMES


  • Farmers like scientists, explore, ask questions, and research to find answers.

  • Living things on a farm grow, change, reproduce, and provide products that humans rely upon everyday such as food, fiber, and labor.

  • Animals and plants have certain characteristics that make them recognizable and help them survive; offspring often share these characteristics

  • Informational text can be used to find answers to questions about what we are studying.

  • Real life experiences help us understand what we are studying and can be shared in our reading and writing.


II. FOCUS/MOTIVATION

  • Observation charts

  • Teacher made big book

  • Inquiry chart

  • Farmer awards (agricultural)

  • Picture file cards

  • Realia

  • Read aloud

  • Cognitive Content Dictionary



III. CLOSURE


  • Process charts and poems

  • Group frame cooperative strip paragraph

  • CCuoS performance task

  • Opinion writing pieces connected to signal words from the picture cognitive content dictionary (using illustration and/or group frame and dictation)

  • A letter home to families/evaluation of unit

  • Build a model farm


IV. ELA Standards, APS Units of Study:


APS Unit of Study # 8

Overview Research Project


Using informational text and drawing on what they have learned, students will complete a research project. With guidance and support from adults, students will research and gather information to compose informative/explanatory writing.     Students will present this information through drawings, or other visual displays and share the information they have learned. Their presentation should demonstrate an understanding of questioning words, plural nouns and complete sentences. Students will recall information, identify the main topic, retell key details, make connections, and name the author/illustrator. This unit does not address literary text.
The teacher will model a research project for the student. This model should include an example of how to present information using questioning words (i.e.; who, what, where, when, why, how).   The teacher should also give clear guidelines of the research project structure and opportunities for the students to show basic knowledge of what they learned through research of informational text. The teacher should revisit the roles of author/illustrator, identifying main topic, retelling key details, and the basic similarities and differences between texts. Teacher will also model for the students how to take the information learned from the informational text and compose informative/explanatory text that includes writing, drawing, and dictating. Teachers should model how drawings and/or visual displays can add detail and give a better understanding. This is a good opportunity to revisit the use of digital tools in producing and publishing writing.
This unit is designed to give students the opportunity to use informational text and create a research project. The project allows them to present to their peers the information they have learned.   Students will present this information in a variety of ways using writing, drawing and/or visual displays. Students will demonstrate their understanding of question words to help express their thoughts, as well as appropriate writing conventions.

 

As with all units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, Kindergarten teachers will read aloud texts within the appropriate range of complexity.   Students should have the opportunity to actively engage with texts that are challenging for them, with support from the instructor as necessary and eventually texts that they can read fluently. Additionally, teachers should model close and/or multiple readings and with support and guidance assist students in expressing their ideas in speaking and writing with evidence from the texts they hear/read.


Essential Questions:


  • How can we find answers to questions about things we are studying?

  • Where else besides a book can I look for information?

  • How does my writing and speaking make sense to others?

  • How do we know if what we read is true?

APS Unit of Study # 9

Overview Making Connections/Higher Level Comprehension
Students will be able to recognize common types of texts (storybooks, poems, informational text). They will confirm their understanding of fiction and non-fiction texts by asking and answering questions about key details in both types of texts. When discussing texts, students will speak in complete sentences and use question words (who, what, where, when, why, how). Students will understand the important relationship between illustrations and text. They will be able to compare and contrast familiar stories and identify similarities and differences in informational texts. Students will use graphic organizers to assist them in understanding the similarities and differences between texts. Students will recall information from experiences or gather information to illustrate and write an informative/ explanatory piece of writing pertaining to a specific topic. Students will continue to demonstrate their understanding of the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (-ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a strategy to figure out unknown words. They will also continue to demonstrate their growing comprehension of verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites.

 

Teachers will continue to provide a variety of texts that will allow for rich discussions, so that students can discuss real-life connections and demonstrate their developing comprehension skills. Teachers will use graphic organizers to display comparisons of familiar stories and make connections between informational texts. Teachers will provide students with experiences that enable them to recall and gather information to be used when composing informative/explanatory texts. Teachers will continue to model the use of question words, prepositions, inflections and affixes, and frequently occurring verbs and adjectives.



 

This unit is taught at the end of the year, after students have been introduced to a variety of types of text. Throughout the year, students have had opportunities to ask and answer questions about key details of familiar stories and informational texts. This unit allows them to demonstrate their understanding of information presented and gives them the opportunity to ask questions for deeper meaning and understanding. Using the information they have gained, they will be able to compose informative/explanatory texts using a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing.

 

As with all units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, Kindergarten teachers will read aloud texts within the appropriate range of complexity.   Students should have the opportunity to actively engage with texts that are challenging for them, with support from the instructor as necessary and eventually texts that they can read fluently. Additionally, teachers should model close and/or multiple readings and with support and guidance assist students in expressing their ideas in reading and writing with evidence from the texts they read.


Essential Questions:


  • What does the big book make you think of?

  • How can we share our real-life experience in reading and writing?

  • How do your real-life experiences help you understand the big book?



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