TR10: a new Focus for Light



Descargar 50.25 Kb.
Fecha de conversión04.05.2017
Tamaño50.25 Kb.

Comunicaciones Inalámbricas Grupo 5

Iván Bernal Ph.D


TR10: A New Focus for Light


Kenneth Crozier and Federico Capasso have created light-focusing optical antennas that could lead to DVDs that hold hundreds of movies.

By Katherine Bourzac





This article is one in a series of 10 stories we're running this week covering today's most significant emerging technologies. It's part of our annual "10 Emerging Technologies" report, which appears in the March/April print issue of Technology Review.

Researchers trying to make high-capacity DVDs, as well as more-powerful computer chips and higher-resolution optical microscopes, have for years run up against the "diffraction limit." The laws of physics dictate that the lenses used to direct light beams cannot focus them onto a spot whose diameter is less than half the light's wavelength. Physicists have been able to get around the diffraction limit in the lab--but the systems they've devised have been too fragile and complicated for practical use. Now Harvard University electrical engineers led by Kenneth Crozier and Federico Capasso have discovered a simple process that could bring the benefits of tightly focused light beams to commercial applications. By adding nanoscale "optical antennas" to a commercially available laser, Crozier­ and Capasso have focused infrared light onto a spot just 40 nanometers wide--one-­twentieth the light's wavelength. Such optical antennas could one day make possible DVD-like discs that store 3.6 terabytes of data--the equivalent of more than 750 of today's 4.7-gigabyte recordable DVDs.

Crozier and Capasso build their device by first depositing an insulating layer onto the light-emitting edge of the laser. Then they add a layer of gold. They carve away most of the gold, leaving two rectangles of only 130 by 50 nano­meters, with a 30-­nanometer gap between them. These form an antenna. When light from the laser strikes the rectangles, the antenna has what Capasso calls a "lightning­-rod effect": an intense electrical field forms in the gap, concentrating the laser's light onto a spot the same width as the gap.

"The antenna doesn't impose design constraints on the laser," Capasso says, because it can be added to off-the-shelf semiconductor lasers, commonly used in CD drives. The team has already demonstrated the antennas with several types of lasers, each producing a different wavelength of light. The researchers­ have discussed the technology with storage-device companies Seagate and Hitachi Global Storage Technologies.

Another application could be in photo­lithography, says ­Gordon Kino, professor emeritus of electrical engineering at Stanford University. This is the method typically used to make silicon chips, but the lasers that carve out ever-smaller features on silicon are also constrained by the diffraction limit. Electron-beam lithography, the technique that currently allows for the smallest chip features, requires a large machine that costs millions of dollars and is too slow to be used in mass production. "This is a hell of a lot simpler," says Kino of Crozier and Capasso's technique, which relies on a laser that costs about $50.

But before the antennas can be used for lithography, the engineers will need to make them even smaller: the size of the antennas must be tailored to the wavelength of the light they focus. Crozier­ and Capasso's experiments have used infrared lasers, and photo­lithography relies on shorter-wavelength ultraviolet light. In order to inscribe circuitry on microchips, the researchers must create antennas just 50 nanometers long.

Capasso and Crozier's optical antennas could have far-reaching and un­predictable implications, from superdense optical storage to ­superhigh-resolution optical microscopes. Enabling engineers to simply and cheaply break the diffraction limit has made the many applications that rely on light shine that much brighter.


Cognitive Radio


To avoid future wireless traffic jams, Heather "Haitao" Zheng is finding ways to exploit unused radio spectrum.

By Neil Savage



This article is the fourth in a series of 10 stories we're running over two weeks, covering today's most significant (and just plain cool) emerging technologies. It's part of our annual "10 Emerging Technologies" report, which appears in the March/April print issue of Technology Review.

Growing numbers of people are making a habit of toting their laptops into Starbuck's, ordering half-caf skim lattes, and plunking down in chairs to surf the Web wirelessly. That means more people are also getting used to being kicked off the Net as computers competing for bandwidth interfere with one another. It's a local effect -- within 30 to 60 meters of a transceiver -- but there's just no more space in the part of the radio spectrum designated for Wi-Fi.

Imagine, then, what happens as more devices go wireless -- not just laptops, or cell phones and BlackBerrys, but sensor networks that monitor everything from temperature in office buildings to moisture in cornfields, radio frequency ID tags that track merchandise at the local Wal-Mart, devices that monitor nursing-home patients. All these gadgets have to share a finite -- and increasingly crowded -- amount of radio spectrum.

Heather Zheng, an assistant professor of computer science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is working on ways to allow wireless devices to more efficiently share the airwaves. The problem, she says, is not a dearth of radio spectrum; it's the way that spectrum is used.

The Federal Communications Commission in the United States, and its counterparts around the world, allocate the radio spectrum in swaths of frequency of varying widths. One band covers AM radio, another VHF television, still others cell phones, citizen's-band radio, pagers, and so on; now, just as wireless devices have begun proliferating, there's little left over to dole out.

But as anyone who has twirled a radio dial knows, not every channel in every band is always in use. In fact, the FCC has determined that, in some locations or at some times of day, 70 percent of the allocated spectrum may be sitting idle, even though it's officially spoken for.

Zheng thinks the solution lies with cognitive radios, devices that figure out which frequencies are quiet and pick one or more over which to transmit and receive data. Without careful planning, however, certain bands could still end up jammed. Zheng's answer is to teach cognitive radios to negotiate with other devices in their vicinity. In Zheng's scheme, the FCC-designated owner of the spectrum gets priority, but other devices can divvy up unused spectrum among themselves.

But negotiation between devices uses bandwidth in itself, so Zheng simplified the process. She selected a set of rules based on "game theory" -- a type of mathematical modeling often used to find the optimal solutions to economics problems -- and designed software that made the devices follow those rules. Instead of each radio's having to tell its neighbor what it's doing, it simply observes its neighbors to see if they are transmitting and makes its own decisions.

Zheng compares the scheme to a driver's reacting to what she sees other drivers doing. "If I'm in a traffic lane that is heavy, maybe it's time for me to shift to another lane that is not so busy," she says. When shifting lanes, however, a driver needs to follow rules that prevent her from bumping into others.

Zheng has demonstrated her approach in computer simulations and is working toward testing it on actual hardware. But putting spectrum-sharing theory into practice will take engineering work, from designing the right antennas to writing the software that will run the cognitive radios, Zheng acknowledges. "This is just a starting phase," she says.

Nonetheless, cognitive radios are already making headway in the real world. Intel has plans to build reconfigurable chips that will use software to analyze their environments and select the best protocols and frequencies for data transmission. The FCC has made special allowances so that new types of wireless networks can test these ideas on unused television channels, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, which sets many of the technical standards that continue to drive the Internet revolution, has begun considering cognitive-radio standards.

It may be 10 years before all the issues get sorted out, Zheng says, but as the airwaves become more crowded, all wireless devices will need more-efficient ways to share the spectrum.



OTHER PLAYERS
Cognitive Radio

Bob Broderson -- Advanced communication algorithms and low-power devices
University of California, Berkeley

John Chapin -- Software-defined radios
Vanu, Cambridge, MA

Michael Honig -- Pricing algorithm for spectrum sharing
Northwestern University

Joseph Mitola III -- Cognitive radios
Mitre, McLean, VA

Adam Wolisz -- Protocols for communications networks
Technical University of Berlin, Germany

Home page image courtesy of Gregg Segal.

Pervasive Wireless


Can't all our wireless gadgets just get along? It's a question that Dipankar Raychaudhuri is trying to answer.

By Neil Savage



This article is the eighth in a series of 10 stories we're running over two weeks, covering today's most significant (and just plain cool) emerging technologies. It's part of our annual "10 Emerging Technologies" report, which appears in the March/April print issue of Technology Review.

In New Brunswick, NJ, is a large, white room with an army of yellow boxes hanging from the ceiling. Eight hundred in all, the boxes are actually a unique grid of radios that lets researchers design and test ways to link mobile, radio-equipped computers in configurations that can change on the fly.

The ability to form such ad hoc networks, says Dipankar Raychaudhuri, director of the Rutgers University lab that houses the radios, will be critical to the advent of pervasive computing—in which everything from your car to your coffee cup "talks" to other devices in an attempt to make your life run more smoothly.

Wireless transactions already take place; anybody who speeds through tolls with an E-ZPass transmitter participates in them daily. But Raychaudhuri foresees a not-too-distant day when radio frequency identification (RFID) tags embedded in merchandise call your cell phone to alert you to sales, cars talk to each other to avoid collisions, and elderly people carry heart and blood-pressure monitors that can call a doctor during a medical emergency. Even mesh networks, collections of wireless devices that pass data one to another until it reaches a central computer, may need to be connected to pagers, cell phones, or other gadgets that employ diverse wireless protocols.

Hundreds of researchers at universities, large companies such as Microsoft, Intel, and Nortel, and small startups are developing embedded radio devices and sensors. But making computing truly pervasive entails tying these disparate pieces together, says Raychaudhuri, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rutgers. Finding ways to do that is what the radio test grid, which Raychaudhuri built with computer scientists Ivan Seskar and Max Ott, is for.

One problem the researchers are addressing is that different devices communicate using different radio standards: RFID tags use one set of standards, cell phones still others, and various Wi-Fi devices several versions of a third. Linking such devices into a pervasive network means providing them with a common protocol.

Take, for example, the issue of automotive safety. Enabling cars to communicate with each other could prevent crashes; in Raychaudhuri's vision, each car would have a Global Positioning System unit and send its exact location to nearby vehicles. But realizing that vision requires a protocol that allows the cars not only to communicate but also to decide

how many other cars they should include in their networks and how close another car should be to be included. As programmers develop candidates for such a protocol, they try them out on the radio test bed. Each yellow box contains a computer and three different radios, two for handling the various Wi-Fi standards and one that uses either Bluetooth or ZigBee, short-range wireless protocols for personal electronics and for monitoring or control devices, respectively. The researchers configure the radios to mimic the situation they want to test and load their protocols to see, for instance, how long it takes each radio to detect neighbors and send data. "If I want cars not to collide, it cannot take 10 seconds to determine that a car is nearby," says Raychaudhuri. "It has to take a few microseconds."

The Rutgers radio grid is the first large-scale shared research facility that researchers can use to study multiple wireless devices and network technologies. "The sort of real-world complexity, dealing with real-world numbers that [the test bed] allows you to do, is something that really makes it quite unique," says Tod Sizer, director of the Wireless Technology Research Department at Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs.

Sizer's group is working with Raychaudhuri to build cognitive-radio boxes that can be programmed to employ a wide variety of wireless standards, such as RFID, Wi-Fi, or cellular-phone protocols.

While hordes of researchers are developing new networked devices, Raychaudhuri says it is the standardization of communications protocols that will make pervasive computing take off. In just five years, he believes, networks of embedded devices will be all around us. His aim is to reduce "friction" in daily life, eliminating lines, saving time in searching for objects, automating security checkpoints in airports, and the like. "You save 10 seconds here, two minutes there, but it's significant," he says. He claims that just a 2 percent reduction of friction in the world's economy could be worth hundreds of billions of dollars in productivity. "Each transaction is small, but the benefit to society is very large."

OTHER PLAYERS
Pervasive Wireless

David Culler -- Operating systems and middleware for wireless sensors
University of California, Berkeley

Kazuo Imai -- Integrating cellular with other network technology
NTT DoCoMo, Tokyo, Japan

Lakshman Krishnamurthy and Steven Conner -- Wireless network architecture
Intel, Santa Clara, CA

Home page image courtesy of Steve Moors.


TR10: Un nuevo enfoque para la luz
Kenneth Crozier y Federico Capasso han creado una antena óptica enfocadora de la luz que podría llevar a los DVD a almacenar cientos de películas.

Por Katherine Bourzac




Este artículo es uno de una serie de 10 historias que estamos publicando esta semana y que cubren las tecnologías emergentes más significativas del momento. El presente artículo es parte de nuestro informe anual titulado 10 Emerging Technologies, el cual aparece en la edición de marzo/abril de la Technology Review.
Los investigadores que tratan de fabricar DVD de alta capacidad, así como chips de computadora y microscopios ópticos de alta resolución, durante muchos años se han tropezado con el “límite de difracción”. Las leyes de la física establecen que las lentes utilizadas para dirigir haces de luz no pueden enfocarlos en un punto luminoso cuyo diámetro es menor que la longitud de onda de la luz. Los físicos han podido evitar el límite de difracción en laboratorio, sin embargo, los sistemas que han desarrollado con ese fin han sido demasiado frágiles y complicados como para que se puedan llevar a la práctica. La Harvard University electrical engineers encabezada por Kenneth Crozier y Federico Capasso han descubierto un proceso simple que podría llevar a aplicaciones comerciales los beneficios del enfoque más puntual de los haces de luz. Añadiendo “antenas ópticas”, de tamaño nanométrico, a un láser que se puede adquirir en el comercio, Crozier y Capasso han dirigido luz infrarroja sobre un punto de 40 nanómetros de ancho – un vigésimo de la longitud de onda de la luz. Dichas antenas ópticas podrían hacer posible un día que discos como los DVD almacenaran 3,6 terabytes de datos – el equivalente de más de 750 DVD, de 4,5 gigabytes, de hoy en día.
Crozier y Capasso fabricaron su dispositivo depositando primero una capa de aislante en el borde del láser. Luego añadieron una capa de oro. Después retiraron la mayoría del oro para dejar solamente dos rectángulos de 130 por 50 nanómetros, dejando un espacio de 30 nanómetros entre ellos. Estos forman una antena. Cuando la luz del láser golpea los rectángulos, la antena tiene lo que Capasso llama un “efecto de parra pararrayos”: un campo eléctrico intenso se forma en el espacio entre los rectángulos concentrando así la luz del láser en un punto del mismo ancho que el espacio.

Debido a que el dispositivo puede ser adaptado fuera del soporte de los láser de semiconductores usados generalmente en las unidades de CD, “la antena no impone restricción alguna en el diseño del láser”, dice Capasso. El equipo ya ha probado las antenas usando varios tipos de láser, de diferentes longitudes de onda. Los investigadores han presentado su nueva tecnología a Seagate y Hitachi Global Storage Techonologies, dos empresas que fabrican dispositivos de almacenamiento de datos.


Gordon Kino, profesor de ingeniería eléctrica de la Universidad de Stanford dice que otra aplicación podría ser la fotolitografía. Este es el método típicamente utilizado para fabricar los chips de silicona, sin embargo el límite de difracción representa un obstáculo cuando se usan los láser para tallar los detalles más pequeños sobre la silicona. La litografía por haz electrónico, la técnica que actualmente permite fabricar chips con detalles más pequeños, requiere una máquina grande que cuesta millones de dólares y es además muy lenta como para ser utilizada para producción en serie. “Esto es muchísimo más simple”, dice Kino, acerca de la técnica de Crozier y Capasso, la cual cuanta con un láser que cuesta alrededor de 50 dólares.
Sin embargo, antes de que las antenas puedan ser usadas para litografía, los ingenieros necesitarán hacerlas aún más pequeñas: el tamaño de las antenas deben ser ajustado a la longitud de onda de la luz que ellos quieren utilizar. En los experimentos de Crozier y Capasso se han utilizado láser infrarrojos, en cambio la fotolitografía involucra luz ultravioleta, de longitud de onda más corta. Para grabar circuitería sobre microchips, los investigadores deben fabricar antenas de 50 nanómetros de largo.
Las antenas ópticas de Capasso y Crozier podrían tener implicaciones trascendentales e impredecibles, desde el almacenamiento óptico superdenso hasta la existencia de microscopios ópticos de súper alta resolución. Permitir a los ingenieros simplificar y superar a un bajo costo el límite de difracción ha hecho que muchas aplicaciones que cuentan con el brillo de la luz sean mucho más claras.

Radio cognoscitiva
Para evitar la futura congestión inalámbrica, Heather “Haitao” Zheng está buscando maneras de aprovechar el espectro de radio no utilizado.

Por Neil Savage



Este artículo es el cuarto de una serie de 10 historias que estamos publicando esta semana y que cubren las tecnologías emergentes más significativas del momento. El presente artículo es parte de nuestro informe anual titulado “10 Emerging Technologies”, el cual aparece en la edición de marzo/abril de la Technology Review.
Un número creciente de personas están haciendo un hábito de acumular sus computadoras portátiles, y sentándose para surfear inalámbricamente en la Web. Esto quiere decir que más personas están siendo echadas de la red cuando las computadoras compiten por el ancho de banda interfiriendo con otro. Es un efecto local –dentro de 30 ó 60 metros de un transceptor– sin embargo, no hay más espacio en la parte del espectro de radio diseñado por Wi-Fi.
Imagine, entonces, lo que pasa cuando más aparatos se hacen inalámbricos – no solamente las computadoras portátiles, o los teléfonos celulares y BlackBerrys, sino los sensores de redes que monitorean todo, desde la temperatura en edificios de oficinas hasta la humedad en los campos de trigo, las etiquetas de radio frecuencia ID que rastrean la mercancías en el local Wad-Mart, los aparatos que monitorean los pacientes en las clínicas. Todos esos dispositivos tienen que compartir una cantidad finita –y cada vez más visitada– del espectro de radio.
Heather Zheng, profesora asistente de ciencias de la computación en la Universidad de California (Santa Bárbara), está investigando métodos que permitan a los aparatos inalámbricos compartir más eficientemente las ondas aéreas. El problema no es la escasez del espectro de radio; es la manera en que el espectro es utilizado.
La Federal Communications Commission en los Estados Unidos, y empresas similares alrededor del mundo, reparten el espectro de radio en hileras de frecuencia de ancho variable. Una banda cubre la radio AM, otra la televisión VHF, otras incluso los teléfonos celulares, las bandas de radio de los ciudadanos, los dispositivos emisores de tonos breves, y así; ahora bien, justo cuando los aparatos inalámbricos han empezado a proliferar, queda poco lo que queda por repartir.
Sin embargo, cualquiera que ha girado el dial de la radio sabe que, no todo canal en cada banda está en uso. De hecho, la FCC ha determinado que, en algunos sitios o en algunas veces del día, 70% del espectro repartido puede estar sin uso, aun cuando esto es designado oficialmente para hablar.
Zheng piensa que la solución es la radio cognoscitiva, aparatos que comprenden cuáles frecuencias no están siendo usadas y toman una o más sobre las cuales transmitir y recibir datos. Sin embargo, sin una planificación cuidadosa, ciertas bandas podrían terminar atascadas. La respuesta de Zheng es enseñar a las radio cognoscitivas a negociar con otros
aparatos y sus alrededores. Según la idea de Zheng, el dueño designado por FCC tiene la prioridad del espectro, sin embargo, otros dispositivos pueden dividir el espectro no utilizado entre ellos.
Sin embargo la negociación entre aparatos utiliza el ancho de banda en sí mismo, así que Zheng simplificó el proceso. Seleccionó una serie de reglas de la “teoría de juegos” – un tipo de modelización matemática que se usa a menudo para encontrar la solución óptima de problemas económicos– y creó un programa para que dichos aparatos sigan esas reglas. En lugar de que cada radio tenga que decir a su vecina lo que está haciendo, ésta simplemente observa a sus vecinas para ver si hay transmisión y según eso, tomar sus propias decisiones.
Zheng compara el esquema a la reacción de un conductor en el que ella ve lo que otros conductores hacen. “Si estoy en una vía que está congestionada, quizás es momento de cambiarme a otra vía que no esté tan congestionada”, añade Zheng. Al momento de cambiar de vía, sin embargo, un conductor necesita seguir reglas que le permitan evitar encontrarse con otros.
Zheng ha demostrado su enfoque en simulaciones por computadoras y está trabajando para probarlo sobre un hardware real. Sin embargo, llevar la teoría del espectro compartido a la práctica tomará un trabajo de ingeniería, desde el diseño de las antenas adecuadas hasta la escritura del software que hará funcionar las radios cognoscitivas, reconoce Zheng. “Es sólo la fase inicial”, añade.
Sin embargo, las radios cognoscitivas ya están haciendo progresos en el mundo real. Intel tiene planes para construir chips reconfigurables que usarán un software para analizar su entorno y seleccionar los mejores protocolos y frecuencias para la transmisión de datos. El FCC ha hecho concesiones especiales de manera que nuevos tipos de redes inalámbricas puedan probar esas ideas en canales de televisión que no se utilizan, y el Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, el cual agrupa muchas de las normas técnicas la cuales siguen controlando la revolución Internet, ha comenzado a considerar normas radio cognoscitivas.
Puede ser que antes de 10 años todas las cuestiones sean resueltas, dice Zheng, sin embargo, cuando las ondas aéreas se vuelvan más embotelladas, todos los aparatos inalámbricos necesitarán medios más eficientes de compartir el espectro.

OTROS ACTORES
Cognitive Radio

Bob Broderson -- Advanced communication algorithms and low-power devices
University of California, Berkeley

John Chapin -- Software-defined radios
Vanu, Cambridge, MA

Michael Honig -- Pricing algorithm for spectrum sharing
Northwestern University

Joseph Mitola III -- Cognitive radios
Mitre, McLean, VA

Adam Wolisz -- Protocols for communications networks
Technical University of Berlin, Germany

Inalámbrico Penetrante


¿No pueden llevarse bien todas nuestras máquinas inalámbricas simplemente? Es una pregunta que Dipankar Raychaudhuri está intentando contestar.

Por Neil Savage



Este artículo es octavo de una serie de 10 historias que estamos publicando esta semana y que cubren las tecnologías emergentes más significativas del momento. El presente artículo es parte de nuestro informe anual titulado 10 Emerging Technologies, el cual aparece en la edición de marzo/abril de la Technology Review.

En Nuevo Brunswick, NJ, es un cuarto grande, blanco con un ejército de cajas amarillas que cuelgan del techo. Ochocientos en total, las cajas realmente son una única reja de radios que permiten a investigadores diseñar y probar enlaces móviles, computadoras provistas de radio en configuraciones que pueden cambiar al instante.

La habilidad de formar tales redes temporales, dice Dipankar Raychaudhuri, director del Laboratorio de Rutgers University que aloja las radios, será crítico al advenimiento la computación penetrante, en todo, de su automóvil a su taza de café a otros dispositivos en un esfuerzo por hacer su vida más fácilmente.

Las transacciones inalámbricas ya tienen lugar; alguien que corre a toda velocidad a través de los peajes con un transmisor de E-ZPass participa diariamente en ellos. Pero Raychaudhuri preve para un día no muy distante cuando se identifique por radio frecuencia (RFID) las etiquetas marcadas en la mercancía llamen a su teléfono celular para alertarlo a las rebajas, los automóviles hablan con nosotros para evitar choques, y las personas de avanzada edad porten monitores al corazón e indicadores de presión sanguínea que pueden llamar a un doctor durante una emergencia médica. Incluso mallas de redes, colecciones de dispositivos inalámbricos que transfieren datos unos a otros hasta localizar a una computadora central, puede necesitar ser conectado a un altavoz, teléfono celular , u otros aparatos que emplean protocolos inalámbricos diversos.

Ciento de investigadores en las universidades, compañías grandes como Microsoft, Intel, y Nortel, y los negocios pequeños están desarrollando dispositivos que incluyen radio y sensores. Pero debe hacerse redes de computadoras penetrantes con desigual dispositivos, dice Raychaudhuri, profesor de ingeniería eléctrica y computación en Rutgers. Las maneras encontradas de realizar es la reja de prueba de radio que Raychaudhuri construyó con científicos en computación, por Iván Seskar y Max Ott.

Un problema que los investigadores es comunicación con dispositivos diferentes usando normas de la radio diferentes: RFID utiliza una norma, la telefonía celular otra, y los varios dispositivos de Wi-Fi varias versiones de un tercero. Tales dispositivos uniéndose en un medios de las rede penetrantes que les proporcionan un protocolo común.

Por ejemplo, tome el problema de seguridad en los automóviles. Permitir a los automóviles comunicarse entre sí podría prevenir choques; la visión de Raychaudhuri, cada automóvil tendría una unidad de Sistema de Posicionamiento Global y enviaría su situación exacta a los vehículos cercanos. Pero comprendiendo que la visión requiere un protocolo que no sólo permite los automóviles comunicarse, pero también para decidir cuántos automóviles mas debe incluir en su rede y cómo otro automóvil debe ser incluido. Así como programadores desarrollan aspirantes para tale protocolo, ellos los prueban su base de radio. Cada caja amarilla contiene una computadora y tres radios diferentes, dos para manejar las varias normas de Wi-Fi y uno que usan Bluetooth o ZigBee, protocolos de rangos cortos inalámbricos para la electrónica personal y por supervisar o controlar dispositivos, respectivamente. Los investigadores configuran las radios para imitar la situación que ellos quieren probar y cargar sus protocolos para ver, por ejemplo, cuánto tiempo toma cada radio para descubrir a los vecinos y enviar datos. "Si yo quiero automóviles para no chocar, no puede tomar 10 segundos para determinar que un automóvil está cercano," dice Raychaudhuri. "Tiene que tomar unos microsegundos."

La reja de radios de Rutgers es la primera investigación compartida de gran escala que investigadores pueden estudiar dispositivos inalámbricos múltiples y tecnologías de la red. "La clase de complejidad del mundo real, trata con números del mundo real que [la base experimental] le permite hacer, es que realmente lo hace bastante único," dice Tod Sizer, director del departamento de Investigación de Tecnología Inalámbrica si como Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs.

El grupo de Sizer está trabajando con Raychaudhuri para construir cajas de radio cognoscitiva que pueden programarse para emplear una amplia variedad de normas inalámbricas, como RFID, Wi-Fi, o protocolos de telefonía celular.

Mientras los investigadores están desarrollando nuevos dispositivos conectados una red de computadoras, Raychaudhuri dice que es la regularización de protocolos de comunicaciones que harán informática sea penetrante. En cinco años, él cree, las redes de estos dispositivos estarán alrededor de nosotros. Su objetivo es reducir "fricción" en la vida diaria y elimina líneas, ahorrar tiempo buscando objetos, automatizando puntos de control de seguridad en aeropuertos. "Usted ahorra 10 segundos aquí, dos minutos allí, pero es significante," él dice. Él asegura una reducción del por ciento de fricción en la economía del mundo podría merecer la pena en productividad. "Cada transacción es pequeña, pero el beneficio a la sociedad es muy grande."



OTROS ACTORES

Pervasive Wireless



David Culler -- Operating systems and middleware for wireless sensors
University of California, Berkeley

Kazuo Imai -- Integrating cellular with other network technology
NTT DoCoMo, Tokyo, Japan

Lakshman Krishnamurthy and Steven Conner -- Wireless network architecture
Intel, Santa Clara, CA


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©bazica.org 2016
enviar mensaje

    Página principal